Last edited by Samujas
Friday, July 17, 2020 | History

2 edition of W. Reginald Bray found in the catalog.

W. Reginald Bray

John Tingey

W. Reginald Bray

the Englishman who posted himself and other curious objects

by John Tingey

  • 104 Want to read
  • 5 Currently reading

Published by Princeton Architectural Press in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Bray, Willie Reginald, -- 1879-1939,
  • Postal service -- Great Britain -- History

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references.

    StatementJohn Tingey.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHE6935 .T56 2010
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23962429M
    LC Control Number2009048612

    The Englishman who Posted Himself and Other Curious Objects by Tingey, John(Septem ) Hardcover on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Buy a cheap copy of The Englishman who Posted Himself and book by John Tingey. The first impression of W. Reginald Bray () was one of an ordinary middle-class Englishman quietly living out his time as an accountant in the leafy suburb Free shipping over $

    w. Reginald Bray () was an ordinary middle-class Englishman living in the then leafy South London suburb of Forest Hill. 3, total views, 1 views today.   John Tingey's The Englishman Who Mailed Himself and Other Curious Objects (Princeton Architectural Press, ) may well be the best designed book of the year. Tingey's fascinating subject, combined with Deb Wood's excellent design, make this book not only a great read, but a treat for the eye and a wonderful example of how imagery, typography, and text can work together to create a beautiful Missing: W. Reginald Bray.

    And it was an eye-opener to get to know that mail artists weren't the first, and that W. Reginald Bray in fact was the pioneer. I loved to discover his mail adventures, thanks to John Tingey's book. Fine Books Review Going Postal. The extraordinary story of eccentric collector W. Reginald Bray By Ellen F. Brown. Catalogues Received. Recently published catalogues from the world of collecting. Calendar. Find book fairs and auctions in your area or around the world.


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W. Reginald Bray by John Tingey Download PDF EPUB FB2

Hardcover The Englishman Who Posted Himself and Other Curious Objects tells W. Reginald Bray's remarkable tale for the first time and includes delightful illustrations of some of his most amazing postal creations. Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App/5(12).

Bray () was an avid collector who amassed stamps, postmarks, train tickets, and girlfriends, and who, after reading the entire British Post Office Guide, impishly determined to Author: Deirdre Foley Mendelssohn. An entertaining new book describes how W. Reginald Bray dispatched more t curios over the decades, at one point incurring the wrath of Adolf Hitler.

MLA Format. George Arents Collection, The New York Public Library. Reginald Bray, The Human Letter." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. BOOK CHOICE of THE DAY The first impression of W. Reginald Bray () was one of an ordinary middle-class Englishman quietly living out his time as an accountant in the leafy suburb of Forest Hill, London.

A glimpse behind his study door, however, revealed his extraordinary passion for sending unusual items through the mail. Following on to our last post (no pun intended) here’s a wonderful book on the late great W.

Reginald Bray () called “The Englishman who posted himself and other curious Objects” by John Tingey. It’s currently out of print but is available on Amazon for a nice price. From the description of the book on Amazon (British site here; American site here) and Tingey’s website, I found the following information about Reginald Bray: He seemed to have lived a quiet middle-class life as an accountant in Forest Hill, Kent.

Inhe bought a copy of the Post Office Guide and that changed his life. He studied the regulations W. Reginald Bray book discovered that the smallest. Sir Reginald Bray is often mentioned as Margaret Beaufort’s man of business and then as Henry VII’s advisor - a sort of Tudor prime minister and chancellor of the exchequer rolled into one politically astute package.

Bray first came to Tudor attention when he was master of the household to Margare Beaufort’s third husband (if. W Reginald Bray This website is dedicated to the postal activities of W. Reginald Bray.

Bray lived for most of his life in Forest Hill, Kent from birth in to before moving to Croydon where he passed away in His lifelong passion was to send items through the post that, in one form or other, challenged the Postal system.

Reginald Bray was born in the parish of St John Bedwardine, near Worcester, Worcestershire, England about ; the second son of Sir Richard Bray, one of the privy council of Henry VI.

Education Reginald Bray was educated at the Royal Grammar School Worcester. Career Reginald Bray was created a Knight of the Bath at the coronation of Henry VII. John Tingey's beautifully written, beautifully designed and beautifully illustrated book chronicles the story of W.

Reginald Bray ( - ), who tested the limits of postal regulations by sending different unwrapped objects - a turnip, a bowler hat, his terrier, and yes, himself - through the mail/5(). One of hundreds of thousands of free digital items from The New York Public Library.

Reginald Bray posing in the middle, with two postal workers. Most will not discount the idea that the ultimate prankster in history was W.

Reginald Bray (), the man who inspired the book The Man Who Posted Himself and who toyed with the Postal Service by mailing whatever he hypothesized was physically possible to send through mail.

Following on to our last post (no pun intended) here’s a wonderful book on the late great W. Reginald Bray () called “The Englishman who posted himself and other curious Objects” by John ’s currently out of print but is available on Amazon for a nice price.

Before Christmas I knew nothing of the man (who resided at one time not 15 minutes walk from where I now live.

The narrative is easy to read and the illustrations are well produced and clearly explained. As Reginald Bray's collection of o items was sold and broken up over 50 years ago, it is a tribute to the author that he has been able to trace so many of them.

The book may be relatively short, but it is entertaining and I enjoyed reading it/5(17). 2. Reginald Bray W. Reginald Bray had a peculiar hobby- he sent things through the mail.

These were items that were not specifically prohibited, but created a. BRAY, Sir REGINALD (d. ), statesman and architect, was the second son of Sir Richard Bray, one of the privy council to Henry VI, by his wife Joan Troughton.

The father was of Eaton-Bray in Bedfordshire, and lies buried in the north aisle of Worcester cathedral; Leland speaks of him as having been, by the report of some, physician to Henry. Reginald Bray This ebook list for those who looking for to read W.

Reginald Bray, you can read or download in PDF, ePub or Mobi. May some of ebooks not available on your country and only available for those who subscribe and depend to the source of library websites. The antics of W Reginald Bray live on today in the form of an established network of "mail artists" who send unusual objects through the post to one another.

Many have not. W. Reginald Bray (Freak Letters) postcard to "Any Resident of London", / script from BBC radio programme, /envelope crocheted by Bray's mother, from The Englishman Who Posted Himself and Other Curious Objects by John Tingey, Princeton Architectural Press, NY, The book documents W.

Reginald Bray's experiments with the. And some philatelists love the Post Office much too much. W. Reginald Bray, a turn-of-the-twentieth-century British eccentric, was gleefully enamored of the Post Office.

But, as his biographer John Tingey noted, the people at the Post Office were probably less enamored of him, considering the trouble he put them : Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill. A new book called The Englishman who Posted Himself and Other Curious Objects tells the amazing story of W.

Reginald Bray, a stamp collector who. InBritish prankster W. Reginald Bray decided to test the limits of the Royal Mail. He began a series of experiments, mailing everything from turnips to rabbit skulls to Russian cigarettes — and, on three occasions, himself — up until his death in